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Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire CRC launch Volunteer Peer Mentoring Service

20.01.17

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Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC) has launched a Volunteer Peer Mentoring service to help offenders turn their lives around and prevent crime in the region.

Volunteer peer mentors are ex-offenders or those currently under licence who have made good progress during their probation and are keen to help offenders in their rehabilitation. HLNY CRC is responsible for supervising offenders and ensuring they comply with their sentence and the orders of the court. It manages more than 8,000 offenders at any one time and an average of 600 new cases a month. HLNY CRC is part of Purple Futures, an Interserve-led partnership.

Martin Davies, HLNY CRC chief executive, said: “Volunteer peer mentors play a vital role in supporting offenders as they emerge from the criminal justice system. Given their life experiences and their own journey to rehabilitation they can inspire others to make positive life changes. Mentors can bring a view and knowledge to the work that we do in Yorkshire/Humberside/Lincolnshire.”

Peer mentors will be trained and will work alongside HLNY CRC staff in the delivery of a variety services such as unpaid work and general support to help offenders reform. Volunteers will be encouraged to rotate between duties and roles depending on their strengths, skills, suitability and interests.

Helen Gunn, HLNY CRC’s mentor coordinator, based in Hull, said: “Peer mentoring can be personally rewarding and can open doors to unlock an individual’s potential and help people in gaining work experience and building skills with access to training which, in turn, could lead to future employment.

“Volunteer peer mentor’s real-life experience, skills and commitment means they can make a real difference to the community and individuals. Volunteering can have an invaluable contribution to offenders and help empower them to change lives.”

Mentoring support can be pivotal in helping offenders to believe that they can take responsibility for their actions and turn away from crime, and that this can have a significant and measurable impact on re-offending.

Through its work with volunteer peer mentors HLNY CRC can provide evidence that offenders have a lot to give and a lot to gain from peer support. To be effective, peer mentors must be highly committed and well-supported, individuals who have instant credibility with offenders. They can say that they have walked in their shoes and represent the idea that – ‘if I could make these changes, so can you’.

User Voice and HLN CRC join forces to stop offenders from re-offending in the North

User Voice and HLN CRC join forces to stop offenders from re-offending in the North

20.01.17

UserVoice

Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC) has announced a partnership with charity User Voice, to support offenders as they progress through the criminal justice system.

User Voice is led and delivered by ex-offenders, who have the special ability to gain the trust of, access to, and insight from people within the criminal justice system.

HLNY CRC is responsible for supervising offenders and ensuring they comply with their sentence and the orders of the court. It manages more than 5,000 offenders at any one time and an average of 300 new cases a month. HLNY CRC is part of Purple Futures, an Interserve-led partnership.

Lee Christensen, engagement team member at User Voice in the North-East, said: “We work on the principle that only offenders can stop re-offending so those in prison can talk to ex-offenders to understand how they can turn their lives around.

“Rehabilitation is possible, and people with convictions can turn their lives into an active force for good in society. Rehabilitation is the goal of all User Voice’s work, a process which goes deeper than reducing offending.”

Martin Davies, HLNY CRC chief executive, said: “User Voice is a great example of how the probation service can work with people to make a key difference to their lives. Key to User Voice’s work are Service User Councils. These offer a structured forum where offenders and HLNY CRC staff can come together to discuss how to make improvements to probation and give service users a voice.”

The Councils are groups of people who are, or have been on probation or licence. They engage with other people who report to probation offices about issues to do with their rehabilitation. Following the engagement work, proposals are developed which are aimed at resolving any common issues which can lead to re-offending.

Gail Bland, User Voice programme manager and another ex-offender, said: “The offenders’ involvement can often have wider and unforeseen benefits for rehabilitation. When they are involved in the design and delivery of rehabilitation services they are often its most powerful advocate, promoting understanding among offenders and acting as ambassadors for change and rehabilitation.

She added: “User Voice is well placed to gain the trust and access to those involved in crime or who have direct experience of the criminal justice system. Its work aims to deliver a powerful rehabilitation experience for service users, better criminal justice services and institutions, and more effective policy. “

Saint Thomas and probation service bring some Christmas cheer to York

Saint Thomas and probation service bring some Christmas cheer to York

20.12.16

Rachel Bell gets in the festive spirit for York Christmas dinner

Rachel Bell gets in the festive spirit for York Christmas dinner

Saint Thomas Church, in the heart of The Groves, York will be bringing a litle bit of Christmas cheer to York’s homeless community tomorrow (Wednesday, December 21) when it will host a festive feast for more than 50 people. The drop-in group, called Encounter, which was set up with St Thomas’ next door neighbour Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC) will feed more than 50 people with roast turkey and all the trimmings.

Encounter was set up by Rachel Bell, case manager at HLNY CRC, to create a space in the city where vulnerable people including offenders can drop in with the aim of developing a community where people can access help and support with any issues they may be having.

Rachel said: “At this time of year it’s good to reflect on all the positive things which have happened at Encounter – particularly where we have helped offenders find their way back into society and their local community. So we are planning a real celebration with good food, crackers, presents and karaoke.”

HLNY CRC work in collaboration with a number of partners and stakeholders to reduce reoffending in local communities through the effective rehabilitation and punishment of offenders – many of them working on Community Payback. Rachel set up Encounter with the Rev Alistair Rycroft as a drop-in centre for people to come and share their problems and benefit from being part of their local community. More than 35 people attend Encounter every week with the aim of encouraging HLNY CRC service users to become involved in their local community.

She said: “Encounter is open to all. We aim to be inclusive so do not exclude any service user. The ages range from early 20’s to pensioners and now we are established in York, we also have some of our homeless community who use the service.” Encounter has also set up a foodbank which has links with other charities who give the group their ‘overspill’ which has proved to be a huge success.

Rev Alistair Rycroft said: “Encounter is now nearly two years old and has now become an important feature in York supporting offenders and the disadvantaged in our city. This Christmas celebration is an opportunity to give thanks for all that the volunteers have achieved.”

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Volunteers and Community Payback offenders load up for Operation Christmas Child

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Volunteers and Community Payback offenders load up for Operation Christmas Child

02.12.16

Scarborough charity volunteers, supported by offenders on Community Payback, will send some Christmas cheer to children in Eastern Europe this week (Thursday, December 8) when they load up lorries taking more than 9,000 Christmas boxes to Belarus.

Kind-hearted Scarborough supporters of Operation Christmas Child have been busy packing shoeboxes throughout November to be sent to youngsters abroad.

The appeal, which takes place each year in November, encourages people to fill boxes with items such as soft toys, games, crayons, hats, scarves and sweets for youngsters who might not otherwise get any presents.

With all the boxes now collected offenders on Community Payback will now load the lorries with 9,000 boxes.

Managed by the Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC), Community Payback involves teams of people on unpaid work orders supporting community projects.

Scarborough coordinator Ros Dyson said: “We are very grateful for all the support we have received across the Scarborough area in donations and for the help from people on Community Payback – who do a brilliant job for us loading up the truck with Operation Christmas Child shoeboxes.

“This is the fifth year that the Community Payback Team in Scarborough have helped to load the truck taking Christmas shoeboxes to needy children in Eastern Europe. We would have big problems if we did not have this help. The members of the team are fantastic and most willing to help with this physical job. We regard them as an essential part of our team.”

Operation Christmas Child is a project of the parent charity Samaritans Purse, and more than 70 volunteers across the district have helped process the boxes with the support of local businesses.

Stephen Trotter, Community Payback supervisor, said: “We have provided the muscle to load the trucks for five years now and the feedback from Ros and the Operation Christmas Child team has been fantastic and it is a great testament to the work we do.”

Martin Davies, chief executive of HLNY CRC, said: “Community Payback schemes like the one delivered in Scarborough provide a means by which those on probation learn new skills to support their rehabilitation and future employment prospects and put something back into their local community.”

Over the past 12 months HLNY CRC has supervised a wide range of community payback projects across North Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Humberside bringing real benefits to the communities.

*The Community Payback Team would like to hear about other projects which residents think will make a real difference to their community. Contact it by emailing communitypayback@hlny.probation.gsi.gov.uk.

Community payback workers transform North Yorkshire village church at Cundall

Community payback workers transform North Yorkshire village church at Cundall

02.12.16

An historic church in the centre of Cundall village, near Thirsk, North Yorkshire has been transformed thanks to the of work by 13 offenders on Community Payback.

The scheme, managed by the Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC), has involved teams of people on unpaid work orders clearing weeds from the graveyard, undergrowth and re-installing fallen gravestones opening up the space to visitors.

Now St Mary & All Saints parish church, a Grade I listed building which was rebuilt in 1854, has had a major makeover in the graveyard and in the church itself.

The graveyard has been cleared of weeds and undergrowth and fallen gravestones have been re-installed opening up the space to visitors.

Liz Rushton, Community Payback Manager, who supervised the renovation said: “The feedback has been fantastic and it is a great testament to the work carried out by the team – one visitor from Canada said she would never have been able to identify her ancestor’s grave stone before it was cleaned up and exposed from the undergrowth.”

Community Payback aims to rehabilitate offenders through working on projects that benefit the community.

Other work at St Mary & All Saints included the renovation of the 19th century nave, removal of peeling plaster, a new paint job on the walls and ceilings and remediation work on the church’s ancient roof timbers. Among the community payback workers were a group of experienced builders and plasterers who helped renovate parts of the vestry and main tower.

Offenders are now putting the finishing touches to the church by helping to rebuild more than 50 metres of the perimeter stone wall.

The work has been praised by local community leaders.

Nigel Tapley, local resident and a bench chairman at Northallerton Magistrates Court and chair of the North Yorkshire Police Authority’s standards committee, said: “As a magistrate I have always seen unpaid work as something as a soft option but after this I can see the human side of Community Payback and the pride taken in the work done by the offenders.

“It’s also enabled us to do a lot of things we would not have been able to do without the help of HLNY CRC and the offenders its supports.”

Peter Stanley, treasurer and secretary of Cundall Parochial Church Council, said: “The church desperately needed repainting and decorating and they did a smashing job – it really was a professional job. What really impressed me was that the supervisors treated the community payback workers as human beings and as a result they worked their socks off and seemed to get real satisfaction out of it.”

He estimates that the work carried out by HLNY CRC saved the council more than £15,000.

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Historic Fen church blooms again thanks to restoration work by community payback workers

Historic Fen church blooms again thanks to restoration work by community payback workers

29.11.16

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Algarkirk’s St Peter & St Paul Church, known as the Cathedral of the Fens, is undergoing a transformation thanks to the work of offenders working on a Community Payback scheme.

The scheme, managed by the Humber, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC), has involved teams of people on unpaid work orders at the church in the ancient village of Algarkirk, near Boston.

Now St Peter & St Paul, a Grade I listed building, has had a major makeover in the graveyard and there are long-term plans to renovate some the building’s interior. The graveyard has been cleared of weeds and undergrowth and buried graves revealed – including that of Rector Basil Berdidge who commissioned and paid for the installation of the beautiful stained glass and decorative plasterwork that has made this building a national treasure.

And. now that the space surrounding the church has been opened to visitors, people have been expressing their pleasure and gratitude for the CRC’s work.

Nigel Harris, projects officer at HLNY CRC, said: “Since we began work at St Peter & St Paul back in October, the reaction from villagers and other visitors to the church has been very positive as they have witnessed at the genuine contribution offenders can make when working on a Community Payback scheme.”

Community Payback aims to rehabilitate offenders through working on projects that benefit the community.

Since August the team working at St Peter & St Paul, have formed an ongoing working partnership in Algarkirk to deliver noticeable results and are now putting the finishing touches to the church yard renovation.

Next year HLNY CRC will be working with the Heritage Skills Team at Lincoln Cathedral to deliver restoration training for offenders as part of the on-going work on St Peter & St Paul’s interior.

The work has been praised by local community leaders, and the Parochial Church Council have unanimously agreed to the erection of a plaque to commemorate the team’s role in restoring the churchyard.

Churchwarden, Cheryllyn Humphreys, said: “The work carried out by the people on the payback scheme has made a great difference. We could never have afforded to have this work carried out. Not only have the payback team opened up the vista of the church but we have actually seen flowers appearing on graves newly uncovered by the team.

“Villagers have told us the work has restored their faith in the community payback scheme. In the past they believed that payback didn’t really do anything, but this has been a real eye-opener for them.”

Ms Humphreys added: “People have also commented on how polite the workers were, which is another indication of how often villagers have been stopping to speak to the them. We have even had an offer from a couple of ladies to come and make tea for the men at midday.”

Martin Davies, chief executive of HLNY CRC, said: “Community Payback schemes like the one delivered at St Peter & St Paul Church provide a means by which offenders learn new skills to support their rehabilitation and future employment prospects, and also put something back into their local community.”

Algarkirk residents are now seeking to establish a local history research centre in the church that will act as an archive of information relating to all periods of history at the church and the village of Algarkirk. The village is said to be named after Algar, Earl of Mercia, who was killed at Threekingham in 870 while resisting the Danes and is reputedly buried in the graveyard of St Peter and St Paul.

Over the past 12 months HLNY CRC has supervised a wide range of community payback projects across North Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Humberside bringing real benefits to the communities.

Offenders in Selby give Quaker Memorial Gardens a makeover in Community Payback scheme

Offenders in Selby give Quaker Memorial Gardens a makeover in Community Payback scheme

22.11.16

Quaker Memorial Gardens - before work began

Quaker Memorial Gardens – before work began

Quaker Memorial Gardens in the heart of Selby has undergone a transformation thanks to the work of a number of offenders working on a Community Payback scheme.

The scheme, managed by HLNY CRC, has involved teams of people on unpaid work orders in the town centre.

Now the garden just off Audus Street, named after John Audus a local ship owner, merchant and benefactor to the town during the 18th century, has had a major makeover. The area has been cleared of weeds and undergrowth by those on probation and railings and benches in the seating area have been renovated and repainted to create a more attractive aspect in the town.

The team have also removed all rubbish from the area and leveled the landscaping in preparation for the planting of wild flowers and shrubs to create and attractive public space.

John Audus transformed and gentrified part of Selby, when it was still a busy port town in the 18th Century, inspired by the Georgian architecture of Bath and Buxton. The Crescent is the principal focus of his plan though the centre piece is remains the Abbey which gained an enhanced setting by the curving back of the Crescent opposite its southern elevation.

Chris Long, placement coordinator at HLNY CRC, said: “Since we began work at Audus Street the reaction from town’s folk and others has been so positive as they have witnessed first-hand the genuine contribution those on probation can make working on a Community Payback scheme.”

Community Payback aims to rehabilitate offenders through working on projects that benefit the community.

Aimi Brookes, Selby environmental services officer, said: “Quaker Memorial Gardens now look amazing. The Community Payback team have done a really brilliant job in resurrecting this part of the town made famous by one Selby’s great benefactors. Local community volunteers will now work to further enhance the area.”

Martin Davies, chief executive of HLNY CRC, said: “Community Payback schemes like the one delivered in Selby provide a means by which those on probation learn new skills to support their rehabilitation and future employment prospects and put something back into their local community.”

Over the past 12 months HLNY CRC has supervised a wide range of community payback projects across North Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Humberside bringing real benefits to the communities.

A work in progress - new flower beds awaiting re-planting

A work in progress – new flower beds awaiting re-planting

*The Community Payback Team would like to hear about other projects which residents think will make a real difference to their community. Contact us by emailing communitypayback@hlny.probation.gsi.gov.uk.

One size doesn’t fit all: time to get personal with offenders

One size doesn’t fit all: time to get personal with offenders

21.11.16

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With Interserve, we are piloting five initiatives aimed at supporting people on probation by offering them a personalised service that aims to help them lead better lives.

Those caught up in the criminal justice system often have multiple and complex problems. They also have strengths and resources that they can use to changes their lives. Everyone wins if the people we supervise can be offered the right support to help them reintegrate into their communities, to lead law-abiding lives and to once again contribute to society.

Interserve is responsible for rehabilitating 25 per cent of offenders assessed of being of low and medium risk of harm in England and Wales, including those supported by Humberside Lincolnshire North Yorkshire CRC (HLNY CRC). We supervise and work with low-to medium risk offenders with the aim is to help them reintegrate into society and to prevent them from committing more crime. We want to help people make positive choices, and we believe that personalisation holds the key which could potentially unlock a great deal of potential.

Given the stubbornly high levels of re-offending, it’s time to explore what a more personalised approach in criminal justice can deliver.

A Person-centred approach

HLNY CRC is embracing innovative concepts to support service users – people on probation – to turn their lives around. Our aim is to work with service users to develop solutions that enable them to achieve their goals for personal success. We want them to make the most of what is available to them locally and encourage them to access key support services. The main objective is to give people as much choice and control as possible to develop a package of support that works for them to stop them from re-offending.

Getting personal means designing rehabilitative support packages with service users not for them. This enables them to make personal change and also delivers the sentence of the court.

Such an approach encourages service users to take responsibility for their own rehabilitation and integration into local communities. It moves away from a more traditional and less effective ‘one size fits all’ approach.

Five new initiatives

1. Person-centred practice. While person-centred practice will underpin all the pilots, this initiative will aim to measure what a change in practice will actually deliver.

2. Choice and control promotion through use of a personal fund – set at a modest level – to help the service user achieve specific goals as part of a personal plan.

3. Creating a personal fund held by a women’s service provider to enable the provision of more flexible and personalised support.

4. Co-produced projects with service users to develop their own services and enterprises with a grant. This will be based on the principles of asset-based community development as well as developing entrepreneurial skills for service users.

5. Access to networks of support already available in the community in order to provide more choice and to increase service user involvement in local activities.

Robust evidence

We will explore how to apply these new personal services in practice.

We know this personalised approach has achieved notable results in other fields, and we intend to build on this success. It is still very much in its infancy in the field of probation, but we are excited about the pilots because we believe a personalised approach has the power to support people more effectively as they rehabilitate into the community.

Working with Manchester Metropolitan University’s (MMU) Policy Evaluation and Research Unit and Professor Chris Fox, Interserve, will develop, deliver and evaluate a personalisation model and identify the challenges to introducing innovation and changing practice.

Following delivery of the pilots, we will evaluate the evidence to see which approach delivers the best results for our service users. We will then strive to adopt these approaches at a wider level across our CRCs in order to help us achieve our aim: to reduce re-offending and thereby help improve people’s lives.

Artist Jacob Davy exhibits abstract artwork at Harrogate exhibition

Artist Jacob Davy exhibits abstract artwork at Harrogate exhibition

21.11.2016

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Jacob Davy, who is being supervised by probation, will be exhibiting a selection of his abstract paintings this month [November] at Mowbray Community Church, East Parade, Harrogate.

Jacob recently returned to his passion for art and painting after being given a community order for assault following difficulties with mental illness.

Now with the help of HHLNY CRC Jacob is now seeking to make a full-time living from his art and is investing in a new website supported by his parents, friends, professionals and Mowbray Community Church Community.

Jacob said: “I studied fine art at university but never graduated due to personal issues but I have always painted – it’s just something I have to do. Working with the team at HLNY CRC has helped me to focus on what I really want to do and now I have an opportunity to showcase my work and hopefully make a living from my passion.”

Jacob, who paints on a variety of materials including canvas, wood and doors, says he is inspired by the natural world, the jazz art of the 1940s and 1950s, street art and oriental calligraphy.

Jacob’s HLNY CRC case manager Claire Elsworth said: “Jacob has really progressed since we began working with him and he has gained in confidence through support of the team around him. Expressing himself through art has helped him find a new focus and given him a purpose.

“When Jacob, who has more than 100 pieces of art in his portfolio, showed us his work we introduced him to a number of community organisations who could help support his ambition to earn an income from his art.”

Following the exhibition at the Mowbray Community Church, Jacob is hoping to secure future exhibition at other Church’s and bars in Harrogate.

Mowbray Community Church Evangelist Peter Ingham said: “Jacob is a very talented artist and it is our pleasure to support him in presenting his art which has attracted a lot of attention within the church.”

Offenders help York prepare for winter by re-filling salt bins

Offenders help York prepare for winter by re-filling salt bins

0.11.2016

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As snow began falling across the North of England today and with the UK set for the heaviest snowfall in years York will be ready for the bitter freeze thanks to the help of offenders who have been filling salt bins across the city.

Ten offenders have been working across the city filling York’s salt and grit bins ahead of the big freeze as part of the Community Payback scheme.

The scheme, managed by the Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC), has involved teams of people on unpaid work orders filling salt bins from the city walls to side roads.

The team, supported by local HLNY CRC payback supervisor Zack Lunn, has cleaned out more than 150 bins of old salt and litter and then refilled them with new salt.

Community Payback co-ordinator Ed Gray said: “Community Payback is a punishment for breaking the law but it is also a way for offenders to learn new skills and to support their rehabilitation. Working on this and other similar projects across North Yorkshire means offenders not only give something back to the community but it teaches them valuable practical skills which can lead to future employment.”

He added that it was a positive way to ensure the city’s streets were safer when the bad winter weather comes, especially for elderly and vulnerable residents.

City of York Council Executive member for Transport and Planning, Cllr Ian Gillies, said: “The Community Payback programme is a good way for those on probation to have a positive impact and give something back to the local community. It is also helpful to the council by providing a valuable service quickly, efficiently and at no cost to tax payers.”

The Community Payback team has worked each winter with the council for several years to ensure that the city can meet the challenges of ice and snow.

The Community Payback scheme works across a wide range of projects in the community in North Yorkshire renovating community gardens, parks, church yards and schools.

Martin Davies, chief executive of HLNY CRC, said: “Community Payback schemes like the one delivered in York provide a means by which those on probabtion learn new skills to support their future employment prospects and can be seen to be making a positive contribution to society and the community in which they live as part of their rehabilitation.”

*The Community Payback Team in North Yorkshire would like to hear about other projects which residents think will make a real difference to their community. Contact it by emailing communitypayback@hlny.probation.gsi.gov.uk.

North Yorkshire town benefits from Community Payback scheme

North Yorkshire town benefits from Community Payback scheme

03.11.2016

Community Payback projects rely upon public nominations.

Pickering’s picturesque Riverside Walk has been given a face lift thanks to the help of offenders who have been sprucing up the North Yorkshire town for the past two months.

Offenders have been working across the town to enhance public open spaces and preserve and enhance key street features as part of the Community Payback scheme.

The scheme, managed by the Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC), has involved teams of people on unpaid work orders renovating and repainting the steel railings along Pickering Beck which runs through the centre of the town.

The team, supported by local HLNY CRC payback supervisor Stephen Trotter, also cut back overhanging shrubbery, and stained and repainted fencing and street furniture in the play areas at Otter Drive and Troutbeck Close.

Stephen Trotter said: “Community Payback is a punishment for breaking the law but it is also a way for those on probation to learn new skills and to support their rehabilitation. Working on this and other similar projects across North Yorkshire means offenders not only give something back to the community but it teaches them valuable practical skills which can lead to future employment.”

Andrew Husband, Pickering Town Clerk, said the Community Payback team was a significant and valuable resource for the council. He added: “The team from HLNY CRC offer a crucial helping hand to get the job done quickly, efficiently and at no cost to tax payers. The

Community Payback team has worked with the council for several years to ensure that we can make best use of this valuable resource for the community.

The Community Payback scheme works across a wide range of projects in the community in North Yorkshire renovating community gardens, parks, church yards and schools.

Martin Davies, chief executive of HLNY CRC, said: “Community Payback schemes like the one delivered in York provide a means by which people on probation learn new skills to support their future employment prospects and can be seen to be making a positive contribution to society and the community in which they live as part of their rehabilitation.”

*The Community Payback Team in North Yorkshire would like to hear about other projects which residents think will make a real difference to their community. Contact it by emailing communitypayback@hlny.probation.gsi.gov.uk.

Shaun named as finalist in Interserve’s annual group awards for outstanding service

Shaun named as finalist in Interserve’s annual group awards for outstanding service

31.10.2016

Congratulations to Shaun Anderson, a probation officer at Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC) based in Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire who has been named as a finalist in this year’s Interserve annual awards as Social Capital Champion.

Shaun, who has worked in the probation service for the more than 22 years, goes through to the finals after being named regional winner in the awards which recognise individuals who excel at delivering offender management services in partnership with Interserve’s partner agencies.

The Interserve awards bring together colleagues from across the globe to celebrate our success and to share some incredible stories which have showcased the passion, commitment and ingenuity of our people.

Shaun works predominately in North Lincolnshire, where he has established an outstanding reputation as a key member of offender services amongst service users and criminal justice partners alike. He has organised reporting centres, group work delivery, worked consistently as a relief warden at local Approved Premises and held a demanding probation officer caseload over many years.

Shaun, who has overcome dyslexia and serious physical health issues, has established a reputation for innovation and change, embracing new opportunities with partners and for a cheerful manner when engaging service users.

Shaun says: “The management team has let us develop new ways of working and that is reflected in the way we engage with offenders. Under Interserve the shackles are off which has allowed me and my colleagues to feel that probation is part of the community again.

“We recognise it’s not instant change; we’re just planting seeds which will grow into a robust process – it’s all about being supportive and befriending. It’s about identifying service users’ needs and developing them as people.”

Martin Davies, chief executive, HLNY CRC said: “The work we do is important and it is right that it is celebrated. Shaun’s proactive approach to offenders with complex needs really shines out in a remarkable and impressive way. The award is richly deserved.”

Earlier this year Shaun was named Probation Champion 2016 in the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) award scheme, which recognises outstanding achievements made by staff working in the National Probation Service and the 21 community rehabilitation companies (CRC), across England and Wales.

The accolade of Probation Champion of the Year is selected from the winners of the seven individual award categories and is awarded to the individual who has contributed the most to the work of the Probation Service in 2015.

So, in this Olympic year, let’s send Shaun our best wishes in picking up the double.

Adrian named as finalist in Interserve’s annual group awards for outstanding service

Adrian named as finalist in Interserve’s annual group awards for outstanding service

31.10.2016

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Congratulations to Adrian Evans, an interchange manager at Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC), based in Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire who has been named as a finalist in this year’s Interserve annual awards in the Ingenuity award category after picking up an award for the region.

Adrian has been praised as an inspirational leader who is well respected and liked by staff, service users and partnership agencies. He is a central figure within the local partnership and his experience, skill and tenacity mean he is particularly effective in influencing positive change for offenders and the community.

Adrian champions the benefits of working within communities and has helped hundreds of offenders across Lincolnshire as they have sought to re-habilitate themselves and find a new gainful position in society and the Lincolnshire communities in which they live.

Adrian has led a consistently high performing team. He is most proud of the reduction of the Ministry of Justice’s (MOJ) proven adult reoffending rate by more than 2% points below the England and Wales average which continues on a steady downward trajectory.

Martin Davies, chief executive of HLNY CRC, said: “We are so pleased that Adrian’s effort have been recognised in these awards which reflect so well on the caliber of our colleagues in HLNY CRC. He is highly respected by partners, staff and stakeholders and consistently represents

HLNY CRC with outstanding professionalism, great expertise, knowledge and creativity. He is very worthy of this award.”

Adrian said: “This is not just an award for me. It is testament to the efforts of the colleagues in my team across Lincolnshire that we have been acknowledged in this way. The successful outcomes we’ve achieved have been due to their immense hard work, dedication and commitment to some of the most vulnerable people in our communities.”

Adrian’s award win follows recent accolades for his colleagues Shaun Anderson, who has been named as a finalist in the Social Capital Champion award, and Tony Connell, manager of Lincolnshire Health Support Service, who has picked up the Innovation & Lifetime Achievement award for the region.

Well done Adrian and good luck in the awards in London.

Tony Connell gets Innovation & Lifetime Achievement award as national finals beckon

Tony Connell gets Innovation & Lifetime Achievement award as national finals beckon

31.10.2016

Well done Tony Connell, manager of Lincolnshire Health Support Service and probation case manager, who has been named as a finalist in this year’s Interserve annual awards after picking up the Innovation & Lifetime Achievement award for the region.

Tony has worked in probation services for more than 30 years. He took over the management of the Health Support Service in 2008 and since then has transformed the service enabling people on probation to get advice from qualified nurses, access to training courses and delivering a holistic service which truly supports users with all of their health and social needs.

Crucially the service also offers support to those people considered at risk of offending/re- offending.

The Health Support Service provides health assessments and programmes to offenders. The team consists of staff from the NHS, a local authority and Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company (HLNY CRC), which enables it to draw upon a range of experiences and approaches in relation to the effective engagement of its client group.

Tony says: “We spend time looking at people holistically, so that we also consider their housing, health and their wider needs. We take a wide view of that person’s life and look at the reasons for non-engagement, for example they don’t have capacity to turn up at appointments on time or they’ve had previous bad experience of services.”

Tony adds: “This is not just an award for me. It is testament to the efforts of my team that we have been acknowledged. The successful outcomes we’ve achieved have been due to their immense hard work dedication and commitment to some of the most vulnerable people in our communities.”

On average the Health Support Service has 1,200 service users in Lincolnshire each year helping the most marginalised individuals in the area, who can display the most destructive behaviours towards themselves and those around them – not least potential victims of crime.

Martin Davies, chief executive of HLNY CRC, says: “Tony is always very enthusiastic and motivates and encourages all team members to do the best they can.

“He has given the Health Support Service the direction it needed to keep it delivering outstanding service, always focussing on improving outcomes for the clients. He is open and honest and empowers colleagues to become involved – allowing them to raise ideas and develop new ways of working.

Tony now goes through to the Interserve Group annual awards on November 11 in London. We’re sure that everyone would like to wish Tony the best of luck.

Probation Champion 2016

Probation Champion 2016

Shaun Anderson Champion of The Year 2016

Shaun Anderson, a probation officer in Scunthorpe, has been named as Probation Champion 2016.

The prestigious award scheme, run by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), recognises outstanding achievements made by staff working in the National Probation Service and the 21 community rehabilitation companies (CRC), across England and Wales.

The accolade of Probation Champion of the Year is selected from the winners of the seven individual award categories and is awarded to the individual who has contributed the most to the work of the Probation Service in 2015.

Over the past years Shaun has worked creatively with partners to meet the needs of offenders with complex needs, and specifically those who are immersed in the rough sleeping culture trying to ensure that they are not discriminated against. He has endeavoured to ensure that they can access services in order to end a cycle of crime and a lifestyle that causes serious health and other social exclusion issues.

Martin Davies, Chief Executive, Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company said: “The work we do is important and it is right that it is celebrated. Shaun’s personal values and proactive attitude to engagement with complex people who have offended really shines out in a remarkable and impressive way.

“The award is richly deserved. I am delighted for Shaun and very proud of him, as I am of all the people who were nominated.”

The nomination was made by Shaun’s line manager, Adrian Evans, Interchange Manager, Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company. He adds: “A combination of Shaun’s pragmatism and approachable manner allows him to bring others together to find solutions for the collective good and make a real change to people’s lives.”

Shaun was also the winner of the Working in Partnership category.  This award recognises individuals who excel at delivering offender management services in partnership with one or more agencies.

Shaun has worked for probation services for over 20 years, predominately in North East Lincolnshire. Shaun explains more about his work: “Where possible, my approach has always been to work directly in the communities we serve.  Instead of people who have been convicted coming to me, I choose to work with them in their community.  In doing so, I get to know their family and friends, and better understand their support networks.

“Instead of focusing on the negatives, I am passionate about using a strengths based approach to help people who have offended find purpose – and to take responsibility to develop and change.”

The winners were announced at an evening ceremony on Tuesday 5 July at Shrigley Hall, Cheshire and were presented by Michael Spurr, Chief Executive Officer of the National Offender Management Service.

National Probation Award finalist

National Probation Award finalist

HLNY CRC senior case manager, Shaun Anderson, is a finalist in this year’s National Probation Awards.

The prestigious award scheme is run by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) and recognises outstanding achievements made by staff working in the National Probation Service and the 21 community rehabilitation companies (CRC), across England and Wales.

Over the years Shaun, who works in Lincoln and Scunthorpe, has worked creatively with partners to meet the needs of people who have been convicted and who have complex needs; specifically those who are immersed in the rough sleeping culture trying to ensure that they are not discriminated against.

Shaun said: “Where possible, my approach has always been to work directly in the communities we serve. Instead of my service users coming to me, I choose to work with them in their community.  By doing so I get to know their family and friends and better understand their support networks.

“Instead of focusing on the negatives, I am passionate about using strengths based approach to help people who have offended find purpose – and to take responsibility to develop and change for themselves.”

Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire CRC Chief Executive, Martin Davies, said:  “As with all the award nominations the CRC makes, I am proud of the work we do and it is only right that it is celebrated and rewarded.”

Jackie Green, Community Director, Greater Lincolnshire adds: “The National awards attract fierce competition – which goes to show just how valuable Shaun’s contributions are.  Having worked with him for a number of years I know this is much deserved recognition – good luck Shaun.”

The winners will be announced at an evening ceremony on Tuesday 5 July. You can follow the event and see the results as they are announced on twitter using the hashtag #PCOTY16.

Commissioner spends a Sunday with Community Payback teams

Commissioner spends a Sunday with Community Payback teams

Humberside Police and Crime Commissioner Matthew Grove spent Sunday 20 March out and about with Humberside Community Rehabilitation Company to see the work being carried by offenders sentenced to carry out unpaid work in the community.

Community Payback is a form of punishment given by courts in place of a custodial sentence, and involves offenders ‘giving something back’ to the community.  Local groups and charities can also nominate projects for Community Payback teams to undertake.

Matthew described his day:

“I am a big supporter of Community Payback as it can be so much more effective than a simple fine in deterring offenders from committing further crimes.  On Sunday morning I visited the Humber Bridge Country Park, where one of the rangers told me Community Payback is making a huge difference to the upkeep of the park and without their involvement some of the work would just not get done.  The tasks undertaken range from litter picking to clearing areas of debris and fallen wood and preparing materials for the regular school visits to the park.  At weekends most of the Payback participants are people with jobs and after a full working week, having to spend their valuable weekends on a further seven hour day for no pay when they should be resting or enjoying their leisure time was not something they liked and they made it clear to me they did not want to put themselves in this situation again.

“The afternoon was spent on the Westcliff estate in Scunthorpe where a neighbourhood group are using Community Payback labour and providing supervision through trained volunteers.  The majority of the individuals doing unpaid work here were unemployed and many were seeing beyond the punishment element and actually enjoying the experience of working alongside volunteers to make a difference to the community they live in.  The highlight of the day for me was meeting a disabled gentleman who’d had both legs amputated.  He was having his garden tidied and fence painted by the Payback team.  I hope the strength he is showing in his situation was as inspiring to those doing the work as it was to me.

“I discussed with the CRC managers opportunities to expand the scheme into other areas, for example litter picking on the sides of some of our major roads when they closed for maintenance.  Many of the offenders I spoke to said they would rather pay a fine than do Payback, as much of it is labour intensive, but this is a much more effective punishment than a fine and the feedback I get from members of the public is that they would like to see more.

“I was impressed with the work I saw being done and there are huge opportunities to expand Payback schemes for the benefit of the community.”

Amy Gilbert, Head of Operations, The Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company adds:

“Last year more than 61,000 hours of Community Payback were completed in Hull and the East Riding – equal to over £400,000 worth of work carried out to the benefit of local communities, when compared with the minimum wage rate.

“Community Payback is a punishment for breaking the law, but it is also a way for offenders to learn new skills and to support their rehabilitation. It teaches a work discipline by helping offenders focus on making other choices in their lives.

“Working in partnership remains an essential aspect of Payback. Increasingly we are working alongside staff and volunteers from our beneficiary organisations, whose direct involvement in the delivery of Community Payback enhances the experience on both sides.”

Offenders clean up their act in Selby

Offenders clean up their act in Selby

Offenders, ordered to carry out community work, have rolled up their sleeves to clear rubbish that has been dumped on and around the land surrounding Selby’s newest community asset, Selby Leisure Centre.

Community Payback is a punishment for breaking the law, which involves offenders working on projects that benefit the community.

Teams of up to eight offenders, supervised by The Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company, have helped to make over the area by filling up dozens of sacks of rubbish and cutting back overgrown vegetation – ensuring that the leisure centre environment is an attractive and enjoyable place to visit.

Ed Gray, York and Selby Community Payback Manager, The Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company Limited, explains more:

“The team has been working hard by undertaking activities which are noticeably improving the area – such as litter picking, footpath edging and clearing overgrown public areas near the new leisure centre.

“Community Payback is a punishment for breaking the law, but it is also a way for offenders to learn new skills and to support their rehabilitation.  Working on this and other similar projects across Selby means offenders not only give something back to the community but it teaches them valuable practical skills and techniques to take away for the future.”

Heather Kennedy, Sport Development Officer, Team Leader Community Sport and Active Lifestyles, Selby District said:

“Community Payback has done a brilliant job for us in getting those big jobs done that we just can’t find time for.”

Community Payback is a nationwide project where offenders pay back communities for the crimes they have committed whilst serving community sentences.  Residents can choose the type of projects offenders carry out in their community as part of an unpaid work sentence.

The Community Payback team is no stranger to the Selby area, as the team already frequently undertake work on behalf of the District and Town Council.

Cllr Dave Peart , Selby District Council’s executive member with responsibility for housing, leisure, health and culture, explains more:

“The Payback team regularly maintains areas of the town by litter picking, painting street furniture or cleaning overgrown vegetation for instance – and we often receive comments from local residents commenting that the town is looking lovely.  This is due, in no small part, to all the hard work and efforts of the supervisors and the teams that work there.”

Offenders must wear bright orange high-visibility jackets, marked ‘Community Payback’ while they are working.  The jackets mean residents can visibly see that they are paying back for their crimes.

Between January 2016 and February 2016, offenders in York and Selby completed over 4,000 hours of unpaid work, on projects which might not otherwise be completed.

Offenders help clean for the Queen!

A right royal spruce up!

Offenders in York are rolling up their sleeves for a right royal spruce up of Tadcaster Road, as part of a national campaign to ‘Clean for The Queen’ in time for Her Majesty the Queen’s 90th birthday.

The team of offenders, performing community payback, will be painting half a mile of railings along Tadcaster Road, under the watchful eye of York’s Community Payback supervisor, Joe Murphy.

Ed Gray, York and Selby Community Payback Manager, The Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company Limited, explains more:

“Tadcaster Road is one of the main routes into the City so this is an ideal opportunity for offenders to make a real and lasting difference in helping to keep York looking its best for residents and visitors – as well as looking fit for a Queen!

“It also means that offenders are visibly paying back to the community where they have caused most harm, by undertaking physically demanding work which would not otherwise be completed.”

Throughout the week offenders will also be out litter picking and generally tidy areas of the city, some of which were affected by the recent floods. One of the locations benefiting is Clifton Backies Nature Reserve, where offenders will be edging and scraping footpaths.

Every year offenders complete thousands of hours of community payback supporting local organisations and charities on projects that may not otherwise be completed. Other projects recently completed by York’s payback team include a much needed clean up of the grounds surrounding Yearsley swimming pool and the overhaul of the community garden at Foxwood Community Centre where they have cut back years of overgrown vegetation and re-established the footpaths.

Community payback is a nationwide project which provides rigorous and demanding punishment ordered by the courts. The main purpose is to punish the offender while making sure they pay something back to the community. In York, community payback is managed by the Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company – a prime provider of local probation services.

Cllr Andrew Waller, Executive Member for the Environment said:

“I’d like to thank the Community Payback team for their huge contribution to York’s Clean for The Queen campaign this week.

“This is a great opportunity for residents and organisations to take pride in their local area and spend a few hours together cleaning up. I hope as many people as possible will follow their example and join in, as the campaign benefits both the environment and those who live and work in the city.”

Groups or individuals who would like to take part in Clean for The Queen can find out more at www.york.gov.uk/cleanforthequeen They should register their interest locally by calling 01904 551551 or emailing environmentandcommunity@york.gov.uk Residents may also request a spring clean of an area they feel needs sprucing up on the same contact details.

 

Clean for The Queen Poster A4

Offenders help clean for the Queen!

York residents are being encouraged to roll up their sleeves and spruce up their neighbourhoods as part of a national campaign to ‘Clean for The Queen’ in time for Her Majesty the Queen’s 90th birthday. Whilst litter picks in York are welcome at any time, the campaign focuses on a national weekend of litter picking from Friday 4 to Sunday 6 March. It aims to inspire a million people to enjoy a few hours together tidying up, to make their local area a more pleasant environment.

Clean for The Queen is backed by organisations such as the National Trust, the RSPB, the Women’s Institute, Keep Britain Tidy and all the other major anti-litter organisations from across the UK.

The campaign asks schools, community and friends groups, businesses and individual residents to pitch in and take part. We are delighted to confirm that much of the manpower will be provided by the CRCs York community payback team.

Groups or individuals who would like to take part in Clean for The Queen can arrange events any time up to Sunday 6 March. They should register their interest locally by calling 01904 551551 or emailing environmentandcommunity@york.gov.uk. You can find out more about the national campaign at www.cleanforthequeen.co.uk

Follow the payback team on @HLNYpayback and see payback in action for yourself.

Martin Davies CEO of HLNY and West Yorkshire community rehabilitation companies

Martin Davies, CEO of Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire (HLNY) Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) will assume the responsibility of becoming the CEO of both HLNY and West Yorkshire community rehabilitation companies.

Martin has a long and experienced career in probation, dating back to 2003, including being the Chief Executive of Lincolnshire Probation Trust and Assistant Chief Officer in Avon and Somerset Probation Trust.

The announcement follows the decision by Bill McHugh, CEO of West Yorkshire CRC, to leave the organisation.

Martin adds: “I am delighted to assume the responsibility of becoming the CEO of both HLNY and West Yorkshire CRC. Working closely together to ensure a co-ordinated approach will help deliver best value and provide quality services and products – designed to reduce reoffending and make our communities safer.”

Offender mentoring project secures additional funding

Offender mentoring project secures additional funding

The success of a mentoring project that works to address the many barriers faced by disadvantaged offenders has led to it being extended until 31 March 2016.

Joint financing of £47,000 has been offered by The Humberside, Lincolnshire & North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company Ltd and Lincolnshire County Council’s Safer Communities Services.

The Lincolnshire Offender Mentoring project has been delivered by the national charity, Sova, since September 2013. It was recently acknowledged as an example of best practice during the Probation Institute Centre of Excellence conference in Lincoln in January 2015.

Community volunteers are recruited, trained and supported to work one-to-one with offenders under probation supervision. The team designs and agrees a bespoke support package for each individual offender. This enables and empowers that person to overcome issues to successfully complete their community sentence and this makes our local communities safer places in which to live. Volunteers gain exceptional skills through their training and the interaction with mentees, which often act as a launch pad to a career in criminal justice, social care or other public services.

Since April 2014, 30 offenders have received over 900 hours of support from a dedicated team of volunteers.

Sova Area Manager Samantha Dumoulin says: “In a typical year, Sova volunteers will dedicate 1,000 hours of their time to help offenders in Lincolnshire. They provide practical help in difficult times along with advice, guidance, friendship and understanding that benefits not just the individuals they work with, but the community as a whole.”

Claire Seabourne, Safer Communities Service, adds: “In providing funding to continue this service we recognise that mentoring enriches the support provided to service users and can be effective in creating behaviour change and desistance.”

The project remains committed to protecting the public in order to prevent victims being created. Stopping any victimisation of the public and to areas of the community remains at the heart of what we do. Mentoring offenders through gainfully occupying their time and changing their lives helps us achieve that goal.

Smarter York Big Spring Clean 2015

City of York Council will be joining forces with local residents, community groups and businesses over the last weekend of March to carry out an annual city-wide spring clean of York.

During March, the council will focus on supporting hard-working residents committed to keeping their neighbourhood looking – and staying – tidy. So far, community groups such as the Friends of Leeman Park have committed to spruce up a play ground, Lindsey Avenue Residents’ Association will be encouraging people to recycle even more and the Dunnington in Bloom team will be concentrating their efforts on tidying a layby on the A1079.

Smarter York officers will be working with local businesses to brush up their immediate area as it’s good for business and for the surrounding community. Pupils at Woodthorpe Primary School are among the York schools being encouraged to spend an hour of the last afternoon of the spring term having a Spring Clean. Students are also being approached to join in, as well as staff at City of York Council who are being encouraged to go out and help in their own neighbourhoods as part of the ongoing support the council gives them to volunteer to boost the quality of life in York.

The council is also working with the Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company for offenders sentenced to Community Payback to undertake spring cleaning tasks such as painting over graffiti, fixing broken fencing, picking litter and clearing overgrown areas. Community Payback is physically-demanding work which might otherwise not be done, and is performed by offenders who are supervised by Community Rehabilitation Companies as part of their community sentence.

Anyone who wants to take part can contact any of the groups named above, or they can email smarter.york@york.gov.uk or call 01904 551551. An officer will get in touch to find out how much and what kind of help is available, where and for how long. They’ll also give health and safety advice as well as letting people know where they can collect bin bags from and where the full, tied ones should be left. Individuals wanting to do their bit independently are advised to wear gloves when collecting plastics, tin foil, paper and cardboard, cans and tins but should contact Smarter York if they find needles, syringes, asbestos, dog fouling or other potentially unsafe substances. Care should always be taken to avoid litter picking close to rivers and on roads and private property.

Cllr Tracey Simpson-Laing, Cabinet Member for Communities, said: “While we’re focusing on the last weekend of March this year, don’t be limited by that: anyone’s welcome to leap into Big Spring Clean action any time! Research shows that spring cleaning areas and setting a standard really helps communities take even more pride in their neighbourhoods. Well-maintained areas tend to have less anti-social behaviour and children grow up learning to look after where they live. The annual Spring Clean is a great way for the council to highlight the volunteering opportunities available. Thank you to everyone who’s planning to join in – I’ll be joining you with my litter picker, gloves and bag!”

Ed Gray, Community Payback Manager, Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company, said: “The annual Spring Clean is now in its third year and we are delighted to once again join forces with the Council on this initiative to provide the manpower required. The Spring Clean is a terrific initiative which sees offenders giving visible and demanding payback to local communities where they have caused most harm through their offending.”

Smarter York aims to help volunteers from our local communities and businesses to maintain a clean, green and safe environment for York. The initiative encourages and works with residents to create attractive neighbourhoods with a real sense of community and to tackle the things that can spoil our neighbourhoods for example littering or graffiti.

Probation Institute Workshop 2015: Peer and Offender Mentoring Schemes- 14/01/2015

Probation Institute Workshop 2015: Peer and Offender Mentoring Schemes

On Tuesday 14 January 2015 the Probation Institute held a conference in the City of Lincoln.  One of the key themes of the conference was the use of peer and offender mentoring schemes. Humberside Lincolnshire North Yorkshire CRC Ltd (HLNY CRC) and Sova were invited to host a 2 hour workshop at the conference to share their experience of a recently piloted offender mentoring scheme in Lincoln.  To read more about the workshop and its outcomes, please click here to download the full report.

PI SUI Event 2015

Offenders Achieve Qualifications By Restoring The Region’s Crumbling Dry Stone Walls - 16/12/2014

Offenders Achieve Qualifications By Restoring The Region’s Crumbling Dry Stone Walls – 16/12/2014

 

During November and December, eight offenders in North Yorkshire successfully completed a six day dry stone walling course in the Yorkshire Dales and achieved an accredited basic dry stone walling qualification in the process through the Building Blocks scheme.

Dry-Stone-Walling

The Building Blocks scheme is a joint project between Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and The Lincolnshire, Humberside and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company – running as part of the Upper Nidderdale Landscape Partnership, with funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and the North Yorkshire Police Crime Commissioner’s Community Fund.  The scheme rebuilds damaged dry stone walls in Upper Nidderdale through a training programme for offenders who are on Community Payback.

Community Payback is a nationwide project which provides rigorous and demanding punishment, ordered by the courts.  The main purpose is to punish offenders while making sure they pay something back to the community.

The Building Blocks scheme works with walling professionals who have recognised qualifications in dry stone walling, as well as a Dry Stone Walling Association’s Instructor certificate.  The instructor ensures that all the walls built through the scheme are constructed to a good structural standard, which will withstand the test of time.

At the end of the six day course, Craven College assessed the standard of the offenders – all of whom successfully achieved an accredited basic dry stone walling qualification.

Stephen Bostock, Craven College Rural Skills tutor and Dry Stone Walling Association Master Craftsman and Assessor explains more:

“The offenders built a very presentable dry stone wall, using some very difficult and uneven shaped stone.Although they only had six days training, the quality of their work was very good.  The offenders also demonstrated a good knowledge of the different aspects of the basic building procedure and the regional variations in construction methods.Building Blocks is a worthwhile scheme for all involved – not least the offenders who have developed some invaluable employment skills and, at the same time, built a finished product to be proud of.”

Liz Rushton, Community Payback Manager, The Humberside, Lincolnshire and North Yorkshire Community Rehabilitation Company Limited, said:

“This is a positive way for offenders to give payback to local communities, while at the same time helping them to develop their employability skills to gain longer term stable employment – which is one of the most important factors in breaking the reoffending cycle. We hope that now these offenders have qualified they will continue with their training and development by joining one of the volunteer groups in the Nidderdale AONB.”

Iain Mann, Landscape Partnership Scheme Manager, Nidderdale AONB, adds:

“Dry stone walls are a hugely valuable part of the Nidderdale AONB landscape but many are deteriorating and it’s an uphill battle to keep them in good repair.  Restoring them is important for local communities because they provide livestock control, they are of significant heritage value and they help to shape the landscape of the Dales.”

The next cohort of offenders start work on this project in January.  Over the coming four years the project aims to repair more than 1,000m of dry stone walls to enhance Upper Nidderdale’s landscape and provide nearly 100 offenders on Community Payback the opportunity to achieve a vocational training qualification.

Julia Mulligan, Police and Crime Commissioner for North Yorkshire said:

“This project is an excellent example of how the Community Fund can be used to rehabilitate offenders whilst putting something back into our communities.  Having the proper skills and a recognised qualification goes a long way to getting a job which in turn dramatically reduces the chances of reoffending.  The fact that the dry stone walls in Nidderdale need to be repaired, is also worthwhile in itself.”

Transforming Rehabilitation: Announcement of contract award - 09/12/2014

Following the announcement of Preferred Bidders on 29 October, and following further negotiations between the Ministry of Justice and those bidders, the Secretary of State has announced the award of contracts to the successful bidders for the 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs).

The successful bidder for our CRC is Purple Futures.

The complete list of successful bidders can be found at: www.Justice.gov.uk

This announcement marks the conclusion of a period of robust and thorough assessment of bidders’ mobilisation plans and proposals for the delivery of new and innovative services for offenders.

As planned, Purple Futures is due to take over the running of our CRC early in 2015. It is intended that the provisions of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 will also commence from the date of Service Transition.

If you have a media enquiry related to HLNY CRC please contact us on 01442 295222 or 07740 513535.

Follow us on Twitter @HLNYprobation to be the first to read our latest news.  You can also follow our Community Payback teams as they make a difference in your local area @HLNYpayback

If your enquiry is about an offender under the supervision of the National Probation Service, please contact the MoJ News Desk on 0203 334 3536 (or the out of hours number 07659 173 270).  The news desk operates Monday to Friday 7am-7pm; and the out of hours number operates Monday to Thursday 7pm-7am and Friday 7pm to Monday 7am.